Reza DERAKSHANI (1952-) Iranian

Lot 69
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Reza DERAKSHANI (1952-) Iranian

Shabdiz, 2006 Signed and dated 'R Derakshani 06' (under the right hoof) Fiberglass and mixed media Fibre de verre et technique mixte Unique piece - Pièce unique 118 x 170 cm - 46.5 x 66.9 in. AED 55,100 -110,200 Provenance Anon. sale: Artcurial, Hôtel Marcel Dassault, Paris, Art Moderne et Contemporain Arabe et Iranien, Oct. 24, 2009, lot 43, ill. in colour p. 33 Private collection The symbolism of the Persian horse and its artistic interpretations: Several Persian horse breeds are considered unique in the equine world, and among the most ancient. From the dawn of civilisation, Persians have celebrated the horse in their history, art and literature. From a historical perspective, the first imagery of horses was shown in the 'Naqshe-Rostam' carvings, a site near Persepolis in Central Iran. This carving depicts the son of Shapur I (240 -272 CE), receiving the royal ring from the goddess Anahita, both of whom are on horseback. The cuneiform descriptions on the walls of Persepolis further signify the importance of horses: 'This country, Persia, which Ahuramazda has bestowed upon me is blessed with good horses and good men - by favour of Ahuramazda, I, Darius the King, thus do not fear any other.' It was indeed Darius the Great's (521- 485 BCE) cavalry which forged the backbone of military strength of the first Persian Empire, the Achaemenid Dynasty, with Pasacas, the king's famous horse at its realm. Persian literary sources such as Ferdowsi's Shahnameh depict rich narratives of famous Persian heroes' horses, their roles paramount in heroic deeds and battles. 'Rakhsh' (lightning), Rostam's legendary horse, famous for its speed and spirit, is quoted in the epic: 'Its body was a wonder to behold Like saffron petals, mottled red and gold Brave as a lion, a camel for its height An elephant in massive strength and might' (From the Shahnameh) Another example is the story of 'Shabdiz', the horse belonging to Khosrow II Parviz (Sassanian King 590 to 628 CE). The king loved his
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